District News

 Byram Hills High School Senior Wins Neuroscience Research Prize

Rachel Chernoff, a senior at Byram Hills High School, has won a 2019 Neuroscience Research Prize from the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society.

 Rachel Chernoff, a senior at Byram Hills High School, has won a 2019 Neuroscience Research Prize from the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society.
 

Rachel Chernoff, has won a 2019 Neuroscience Research Prize

Byram Hills High School senior Rachel Chernoff has won a 2019 Neuroscience Research Prize from the American Academy of Neurology and the Child Neurology Society.

A student in the Byram Hills Authentic Science Research Program, Rachel won $1,000 and was invited to present her research at the 71st annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Philadelphia in May. She is one of four winners.

Stephanie Greenwald, director of the three-year science research program, said Rachel is truly deserving of the honor.

“She has worked hard developing her research and perfecting her presenting skills,” she said. “Now she will attend this national conference, walk amongst professional neurologists and talk about her work colleague to colleague. I know this is something she always dreamed of. She truly represents the notion that perseverance and dedication are rewarded in the end. We are so proud of her.”

Rachel was recognized for her novel study that involved ischemic preconditioning, a research technique that protects the brain from future stroke damage by depriving its blood supply in short episodes.

Using this technique, she investigated the source of a specific type of brain cell that helps with immunity and clearing cellular debris. As part of her work, Rachel noticed behavioral differences after ischemic preconditioning between male and female mice, which may point to a hormonal difference in their reactions to neural trauma.

Together, her results lay the groundwork for the use of ischemic preconditioning as a potential preventative technique to reduce the damage from strokes.

The Neuroscience Research Prize, which has been awarded since 1993, honors students whose skill and talent show potential for scientific contributions in the field of neuroscience.